Hiking Dangers.

CampQungaayux 262Hiking in the Aleutians is a wonderful activity.  Sometimes you can hike on old World War II gravel roads, some in fairly good shape; some beyond redemption.  You can actively choose a trail that was used by the Indigenous People, the Unangax, for the past 10,000 years.  If you are hiking somewhere, the landowner does suggest that you use the path most taken.  In other words, don’t be making your own trail.  Damage to the tundra is not encouraged.  It takes decades to repair.  No 4-wheeling off-road.  That is strictly forbidden.

There are dangers when you hike in the Aleutians.  The ones from the environment are only a danger if you don’t know what you are doing.  So, do know what the weather is going to do.  Are you going to make a 6 hour trek, but the forecast is for 60 mile per hour winds to start in 4 hours?  Don’t do it.  Has the fog rolled in during your hike?  Sit down.  Wait it out.  People have gotten very lost trying to hike when they think they know the direction they are going.  Honest.  Don’t move.  People have walked off cliffs.  Common sense is your friend.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOld World War II remnants can cause serious injury from collapsing floors to barbed wire and Rommel stakes concealed by the grass.  Although much work has been done to remediate the stakes, undiscovered ones can still be in place.  Contact with animals can sometimes be unavoidable.  We have squirrels and foxes as land animals.  No big deal, except for the occasional ankle mishap if you don’t watch where you step and happen to step into an entrance to a den.  A bit more treacherous are the wild cows and horses you may encounter on the Beaver Inlet side of the island.  Scan carefully before descending into valleys.  Remember, we do not have trees to climb if you are being chased by an overly curious bull.  Make sure you scan the beaches for sea lions, seals, or sea otters hauled out before you descend.   Harassing marine mammals is against the law.  And, know that disturbing spawning salmon is not something you want to be caught doing.

Eagle nestThe one thing you don’t have too much control over is inadvertently hiking into an area that is a nesting area for birds of prey.  Keep your eyes peeled for nests in the cliffs, although some crazy birds will build nests in the grass near a bluff.  Carry a walking stick, or just a stick.  It just needs to be something you can hold over your head to ward off talons reaching for your scalp.  Most birds of prey won’t descend lower than the highest part of you; usually the top of your head unless you are using a stick.  They do not want to damage their wings.  Being snatched bald headed takes on a new meaning.

And remember to always get a land-use permit from the land owner. https://www.ounalashka.com/land-use/land-use-permit/

Justifications.

Rommel Stake Float 10I love a parade.  Small town parades are the best.  They are full of heart and soul.

Military parades in Washington DC are not unprecedented.  But, in my humble opinion, they really are not a very good idea.  This, coming from an Army brat.  First and foremost, previous military parades have been held to celebrate military victories or when danger was imminent.   The parades were not just an exercise in stroking egos.

According to sources like the Washington Post, the NY Times, and the federal budget, the last military parade in Washington DC was in June of 1991 and celebrated the liberation of Kuwait and the defeat of Hussein’s army in Desert Storm when George HW was President.  It deployed 8,800 enlisted soldiers watched by nearly a million Americans who showed up for the spectacle.  There were tanks, fighting vehicles, missile launchers, fighter jets, and fireworks.  The pavement on Constitution Avenue was deeply rutted by the 67-ton tanks.  The parade generated over a million pounds of garbage, cost over $12 million and left an egregious impact on public and private assets.  Like the Mar a Lago trips, we can’t afford a parade if we can’t solve the problem of our homeless veterans.